Széchenyi Square Pécs

Pécs is the fifth largest city of Hungary, with a population of 145,347, located in the south-west of the country on the Pannonia Plain, close to its border with Croatia. Located in the midst of an agricultural area, Pécs is the natural hub of local products. Finnish electronics manufacturing company Elcoteq and the famous porcelain factory Zsolnay Porcelain are chief industries in the city of Pécs.

Pécs Old Town Map

Pécs Old Town Map

Historical Town Center

Historical Town Center

Széchenyi square is the main square in the historical centre of Pécs. In the middle Ages it served as the market place of the town with the city hall and the parish church.

The center of the Széchenyi Square; The statue of Holy Trinity and János Hunyadi serve as a meeting place for locals.

The center of the Széchenyi Square; The statue of Holy Trinity and János Hunyadi serve as a meeting place for locals.

National hero, John Hunyadi (1443 – 1490) is a father of King Matthias I and the commander-in-chief who defeated the Turkish army in Belgrade. Today, Széchenyi tér is one of the central squares of Pécs, with full of historical monuments.

Széchenyi Square; City Hall, Hotel Nádor, Lorant Palace, Church of St. Sebastian Martyr

Széchenyi Square; City Hall, Hotel Nádor, Lorant Palace, Hospitaller Church of St. Sebastian Martyr

The construction of the City Hall began in 1830 and was completed in 1834. The current city hall was rebuilt to neo-baroque in 1907. The Hotel Nádor was built in 1846 by the trader, Schönherr family. The hotel was nationalized after World War II. Located on the corner of Mór Percel street and Mihály Munkácsy street, Loránt Palace is once the accommodation of the Serb occupying forces. The Hospitaller Church of St. Sebastian was built in 1796 by a local tanner for the Order, Knights of the Hospital of St. John in Jerusalem.

Zsolnay fountain Pécs; In front of the Hospitaller Church stands a Secession style eosin fountain.

Zsolnay fountain Pécs; In front of the Hospitaller Church stands a Secession style eosin fountain.

The Zsolnay factory was established by Miklós Zsolnay (1800–1880) in Pécs, to produce stoneware and other ceramics in 1853. His son, Vilmos Zsolnay, offered to donate the fountain to the city in the memory of his father.

My friends have taken a lot of photographs around the Széchenyi square. “So, let’s enter that green dome building, looks some temple.” (I have lost the camera in the spa house of Hévíz. So almost these photographs are from three friends.)

Mosque of Gazi Kasim Pasha Pécs

Mosque of Gazi Qasim Pasha (Downtown Candlemas Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary) Pécs

The Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, formerly known as the Mosque of Pasha Qasim, is a Roman Catholic church in Pécs, which was a mosque in the 16-17th century due to the Ottoman conquest.

Relief on the outside of the Mosque of Gazi Kasim Pasha.

Relief on the outside of the Mosque of Gazi Kasim Pasha.

The building was built by Pasha Qasim the Victorious between 1543 and 1546. The mosque was converted into a church in 1702, after the Habsburg-Hungarian troops conquered the city.

Entrance of the Mosque of Pasha Gazi

Entrance of the Mosque of Pasha Gazi Qasim

The minaret was destroyed by the Jesuits in 1766, but it is a symbol of Pécs and still one of the largest Turkish buildings that remains in Hungary.

Interior of Gazi Kasim Pasha Mosque

Interior of Gazi Kasim Pasha Mosque

Interior of the church with Ottoman Turkish elements; Is it Islam? Is it Christianity? A really mysterious scene!

Interior of the church with Ottoman Turkish elements; Is it Islam? Is it Christianity? A really mysterious scene!

Mihrab, Ceiling Dome and Pipe-Organ in the Mosque

Mihrab under the Cross, Ceiling Dome and Pipe-Organ in the Mosque. (Mihrab is a niche in the wall that indicates the direction of Mecca.)

After the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mosque of Pasha Qasim, we are going to the Pécs cathedral.

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