Imperial Palace Complex, Innsbruck

I visited the Hofkirche (Imperial Court Church) and  the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum first on that day.

Tyrolean Folk Art Museum (right) and Imperial Court Church (left)

Tyrolean Folk Art Museum (right) and Imperial Court Church (left)

The entrance of the museum and the church.

The entrance of the museum and the church.

Courtyard and Cloister of the Imperial Court Church

Courtyard and Cloister of the Imperial Court Church

Getting into the Court Church

Getting into the Court Church

The Hofkirche (Court Church) is a Gothic church located in the Old Town of Innsbruck. The church was built in 1553 by Emperor Ferdinand I as a memorial to his grandfather Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519), whose cenotaph within a remarkable collection of German Renaissance sculpture. The church also contains the tomb of Andreas Hofer, Tyrol’s national hero.

The cenotaph is surrounded by 28 large bronze statues of ancestors, relatives and heroes.

The cenotaph is surrounded by 28 large bronze statues of ancestors, relatives and heroes.

The cenotaph of Emperor Maximilian I.

The cenotaph of Emperor Maximilian I.

Choirstalls and Altar.

Choirstalls and Altar.

Andreas Hofer Tomb and Portrait

Andreas Hofer Tomb and Portrait

Andreas Hofer (1767 – 1810) was a Tyrolean innkeeper and drover, who in 1809 became the leader of the Tyrolean Rebellion against the revolutionary Napoleonic invasion during the War of the Fifth Coalition. He was subsequently captured and executed.

After the Court Church, I entered the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum. The Tyrolean Folk Art Museum (Tiroler Volkskunstmuseum) is one of the finest regional heritage museums in Europe, located next to the Hofkirche (Court Church). The Tyrolean Folk Art Museum is housed in four wings of a former Franciscan monastery around an arcaded Renaissance courtyard.

Interior of the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum.

Interior of the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum.

Exhibits of Tyrolean Folk Art Museum

Exhibits of Tyrolean Folk Art Museum

The museum houses several carefully restored wood-paneled rooms from the Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, that came from actual farms and noble houses. The museum contains the most important collection of cultural artifacts from the Tyrol region.

Saltner (vineyard keeper) in festive costume, 19th century. And Vogel (self-knowledge), take yourself in the nose, end of the 17th century.

Saltner (vineyard keeper) in festive costume, 19th century. And Vogel (self-knowledge), take yourself in the nose, end of the 17th century.

The Tyrolean Folk Art Museum

The Tyrolean Folk Art Museum

I left Tyrolean Folk Art Museum and entered the Imperial Palace nearby.

Hofburg (Imperial Palace) Innsbruck

Hofburg (Imperial Palace) Innsbruck

The Hofburg (Imperial Palace) is a former Habsburg palace in Innsbruck and is the main building of a large residential complex once used by the Habsburgs. The Imperial Palace was completed in the year 1500 under Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The palace was built to the same scale as is seen today.

Hofburg Main Hall, Celling of the hall, Sala Lorena Room and Hofburg Chapel.

Hofburg Main Hall, Celling of the hall, Sala Lorena Room and Hofburg Chapel.

Photography is prohibited in the Palace. These photographs are from the brochures.

Imperial Palace Courtyard

Imperial Palace Courtyard

From the Imperial Palace, going to the Cathedral. Square in front of the Cathedral.

From the Imperial Palace, going to the Cathedral. Square in front of the Cathedral.

Innsbruck Cathedral

Innsbruck Cathedral

Innsbruck Cathedral, dedicated to the apostle Saint James, is an eighteenth-century Baroque cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Innsbruck. It was built between 1717 and 1724 on the site of a twelfth-century Romanesque church.

Nave and Altar of Innsbruck Cathedral

Nave and Altar of Innsbruck Cathedral

Innsbruck Cathedral is notable for two important treasures, the tomb of Archduke Maximilian III of Austria and the painting Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor).

Tomb of Archduke Maximilian III and Painting of Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor)

Tomb of Archduke Maximilian III and Painting of Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor)

Maximilian III, Maximilian the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights (1558 – 1618) was the Archduke of Further Austria from 1612 until his death. The painting Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor) from c. 1530 is displayed above the main altar. It is considered among the most venerated Marian images in Christendom.

Got out the Cathedral, I wandered around the Imperial Court Garden for a while. This lavish Park was laid out in the early 15th century by royals of the Tyrolean Habsburg and has been opened to the public since the 19th century.

The center of the park features a Music pavilion, where in summer concerts are held frequently.

The center of the park features a Music pavilion, where in summer concerts are held frequently.

The Hofgarten (Court Garden) is located on the edge of the old town Innsbruck.

The Hofgarten (Court Garden) is located on the edge of the old town Innsbruck.

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