Kocahisar Kâhta, Turkey

Kocahisar is a village in Adiyaman province Kahta with the population of 426 in 2000. Main industry of the village is based on agriculture and stock raising.

Walking to Yeni-Kale in Kocahisar village from Arsameia. Kocahisar is west neighboring village of Kardut.

This stone bridge is called "Şeytan Köprüsü (Devil's Bridge)."

This stone bridge is called “Şeytan Köprüsü (Devil’s Bridge).”

Yeni-Kale (New Castle) come to see overhead and advancing along the small river Kahta Çayı (Stream of Kahta).

Yeni-Kale (New Castle) come to see overhead and advancing along the small river Kahta Çayı (Stream of Kahta).

Kocahisar is a rocky village.

Kocahisar is a rocky village.

Arrived at the casttle of Yeni-Kale. Unfortunately, the casttle was being repaired.

Arrived at the casttle of Yeni-Kale. Unfortunately, the casttle was being repaired.

Explanation board of Yeni-Kale (New Casttle) Kocahisar.

Explanation board of Yeni-Kale (New Casttle) Kocahisar.

I walked up to the hillside of Yeni-Kale and took some photographs.

Yeni-Kale (New Castle) in the village of Kocahisar

Yeni-Kale (New Castle) in the village of Kocahisar

The village centre of Kocahisar from the castle.

The village centre of Kocahisar from the castle.

Yeni Kale (New Castle), is a Mameluke fortress from the 13th century AD, located at Kahta Kalesi village, near Eski Kahta (also called Kocahisar) village, near the city of Adiyaman. (Mameluke is an soldier of the slave native in the Islamic world. )

Kocahisar Village

Kocahisar Village

Left the castle of Yeni-Kale, walked through the village of Kocahisar, heading for Severan Bridge (Cendere Köprüsü).

Soon, arrived at the edge of the bridge (Cendere Köprüsü).

Soon, arrived at the edge of the bridge (Cendere Köprüsü).

The Severan Bridge (Cendere Köprüsü) is a late ancient Roman bridge located near the ancient city of Arsameia, Adıyaman in southeastern Turkey.

New bridge for vehicles and old Roman bridge across the Kahta River.

New bridge for vehicles and old Roman bridge across the Kahta River.

The bridge spans Cendere River, a tributary of Kâhta River on the provincial road from Kâhta to Sincik in Adıyaman Province. It is 120 m long and 7 m wide, simple, unadorned and majestic arch.

Walked across the bridge

Walked across the bridge

The bridge was built by four Commagenean cities in honor of the Roman Emperor Lucius Septimius Severus (193–211), his second wife Julia Domna, and their sons’ names as stated on the inscription in Latin on the bridge.

Cendere Köprüsü (Severen Bridge)

Cendere Köprüsü (Severen Bridge)

Over the bridge going to the Royal Tomb Karakus.

Over the bridge going to the Royal Tomb Karakus.

Karakus Tumulus

Women’s Monument Tomb, Karakus Tumulus (Karakus means black bird.)

Karakus Tumulus, the artificial tumulus dates back to first Century B.C. Around the Tumulus there are four pillars, each of which 9 m high.

 Karakus column and explanation board. You should read this board than my explanation.

Karakus column and explanation board. You should read this board than my explanation.

Karakus Tumulus was built by Commagene King Mithradates II and was dedicated to his mother Isias and his daughter called Aka.

Walked up this tumulus and took photos of every direction.

Walked up this tumulus and took photos of every direction.

On the sumitte of the hill, I noticed that two beautiful women have been sleeping for 2,000 years under my foot while taking photos, so went down the hill hurriedly.

It’s time to leave this tumulus, “Farwell, Isias and Aka. See you the next world.”

It’s time to leave this tumulus, “Farwell, Isias and Aka. See you in the next world.”

Left the historic region, went to the Cendere River side restaurant and had late lunch.

Cendere Riverside Restaurant “Neşetin Yeri”

Cendere Riverside Restaurant “Neşetin Yeri”

This restaurant is famous for its fish dishes. But cuisine of fish is better in Japan.

After this, I will take a rest in the hotel. And I will head to Diyarbakır tomorrow.

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