Sils-Maria Upper Engadine

Sils in Engadin is a municipality in the district of Maloja, Upper Engadine in the Swiss canton of the Grisons. The municipality consists of two villages Sils Maria and Sils Baselgia. Sils has a population of 768 (in 2014).

Sils Village Map

Sils Village Map

Arrived at Sils-Maria and walking across a small bridge over a brook into the main street of the village.

Hotel Maria on the main street of Sils-Maria

Hotel Maria on the main street of Sils-Maria

Main street of Sils-Maria “Via da Marias”

Main street of Sils-Maria “Via da Marias”

Local children are playing in the snow.

Local children are playing in the snow.

Post Office and Bus Terminal of Sils-Maria

Post Office and Bus Terminal of Sils-Maria

Sils-Maria is beautiful and rich with nature.

Sils-Maria is beautiful and rich with nature.

Nietzsche-Haus, Sils Maria

Nietzsche-House, Sils Maria

German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche lived in the house during the summers of 1881 and 1883 to 1888.

Entered the Nietzsche house.

Entered the Nietzsche house.

Nietzsche really loved this village. Here is a part of his letter. “Dear old friend, now I’m back in the Upper Engadine, for the third time, and again I feel that here and nowhere else is my right home and breeding ground.” (Friedrich Nietzsche to Carl von Gersdorff, Sils-Maria, in late June 1883)

Getting into the Nietzsche-Haus.

Getting into the Nietzsche-Haus.

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844 – 1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet, and Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.

The interior of the Nietzsche house.

The interior of the Nietzsche house. First Show-room, Professor Basler Room, Oscar Levy Room, Nietzsche Room.

View from the Nietzsche’s house, Sils Maria

View from the Nietzsche’s house, Sils Maria

Open space in front of the Hotel Schweizerhof and Hotel Privata

Plaza in front of the Hotel Schweizerhof and Hotel Privata

Through the front of the horse-drawing carriage taxi I entered the mountain path.

Through the front of the horse-drawing carriage taxi I entered the mountain path.

I had heard that there is an interesting place ahead of this path.

I walked into the path of the forest looking for some viewpoint.

A mysterious pretty girl.

A pink pretty girl was making a snowman.

I asked “Was machen Sie?” She replied “Ich machte Schneemann!” “Was ist das Schneemann?” She said “Wildleutchen!” I didn’t know wildleutchen.

According to the legend; Once upon a time, when Sils-Maria was still called Seglias-Majoria, the village was peaceful and rich dairy farming. Travelers journeying over the Maloja Pass changed their horses here, healed fatigue and bought barrels of salted lake trout from the local fishermen – melting snow caused the lake and the River Inn to burst their banks, flooding the meadows and the forest and cutting off the Village from the rest of the world.

When the little goblin-like creatures known as “Wildleutchen” who lived there discovered that the storage cellars of the people of Seglias were also under water and that the inhabitants were starving, they decided to come to their rescue. As the Wildleutchen could neither fly nor swim, they came up with a very unusual mode of transport to carry food to the residents. They packed the food into balls of larch needles, placed them onto the water, and the reliable Maloja wind carried them across the lake to the hungry people.

These “Silserkugeln” (Sils balls) can still be seen in the autumn, when the larch trees lose their needles.

"Silserkugeln" (Sils balls), the phot from Hotel Castell Engadin St. Moritz.

“Silserkugeln” (Sils balls), the phot from Hotel Castell Engadin St. Moritz.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s