Foncebadón, Province of León.

Foncebadón is also a stop on the way to St. James, Santiago de Compostela.

Left Astorga for Foncebadón

Left Astorga for Foncebadón

Scenery on the way to Foncebadón

Scenery on the way to Foncebadón

Arrived at the ruin like village, Foncebadón and went to the village.

Arrived at the ruin like village, Foncebadón and went to the village.

Foncebadón is a extremely small village in the municipality of Santa Colomba de Somoza, in the province of León.The village is located on 1,430m above sea level and has a population of 13 inhabitants.

Going into the village like ruins.

Going into the village like ruins.

The village, situated on a popular pilgrimage route, flourished during the Middle Ages. But  the Protestant Reformation, the Napoleonic Wars and the construction of new roads and railways led to a decline in the number of pilgrims passing through the village.

Albergue Monte Irago; Taking a rest at the Albergue for a while.

Albergue Monte Irago; Taking a rest at the Albergue for a while.

In the 1960s and 70s, many of Foncebadón’s residents migrated to nearby cities in search of employment; by the 1990s, there were only two people, a mother and son, living among the ruins of the once-thriving settlement.

The abandoned houses on Foncebadón

The abandoned houses on Foncebadón

Ruins of the former parish church of Foncebadón

Ruins of the former parish church of Foncebadón

Mounds of summer grass – the place where old farmer one time dreamed a dream.

Passed the ruins of Foncebadón and proceeded further to the west.

Passed the ruins of Foncebadón and proceeded further to the west.

My friend was exhausted, I was still alive.

My friend was exhausted, I was still alive.

Arrived at Cruz de Ferro

Arrived at Cruz de Ferro

Cruz de hierro or Cruz de Ferro (Iron Cross) of Foncebadón is one of the most important symbols of the Santiago’s Way. I placed a stone with my name that was brought from Hiroshima.

Past the Iron Cross, I found a strange house, such as a shed. Surprisingly it was an albergue on the village of Manjarin. Even more surprisingly, an old man had run the albergue.

Albergue Templario de Manjarin (Hostel Templar Manjarin)

Albergue Templario de Manjarin (Hostel Templar Manjarin)

Manjarín is a very small, almost deserted and desolate place on the Camino de Santiago in the province of León. Manjarín village was devastated in the same way as Foncebadón. Today the town has nine inhabitants.

Flowers from Foncebadón

Flowers from Foncebadón

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s