Pamplona (Ⅲ), Pyrenees (continue)

From Iglesia of San Saturnino, I’m going to Iglesia of San Lorenzo through San Francisco Street.

Plaza de San Francisco

Plaza de San Francisco

Building “The Farm” and Escuelas Municipales (Municipal Schools) on the square.

Conservatorio Profesional de Musica Pablo Sarasate Pamplona

Palacio de Ezpeleta (Ezpeleta palace), built in 1709.

From 2005 the palace is the Conservatoire, “Profesional de Musica Pablo Sarasate” Pamplona.

Pablo Sarasate (1844 – 1908) was a famous Spanish violinist and composer of the Romantic period. He is Basque, born in Pamplona.

Iglesia of San Lorenzo

Iglesia de San Lorenzo (Church of St. Lorenzo) Pamplona

Iglesia de San Lorenzo (Church of St. Lorenzo) Pamplona.

Façade of St. Lorenzo Church

Façade of St. Lorenzo Church.

Statue of San Lorenzo in the church.

Statue of San Lorenzo in the church.

San Lorenzo, St. Lawrence of Rome (c. 225–258) was one of the seven deacons of ancient Rome under Pope Sixtus II that were martyred during the persecution of Emperor Valerian in 258. St Lawrence is thought to have been born in Spain, at Huesca, a town in the Aragon region near the foot of the Pyrenees Mountains.

Interior of the church San Lorenzo (St. Lorenzo)

Interior of the church San Lorenzo (St. Lorenzo)

Upper right phot is the chapel of San Cernin and left is the main altar of the church.

Then, I headed San Nicolás (St. Nicholas Church) through the narrow street, Calle de San Miguel.

Street called Calle de San Miguel

Street called Calle de San Miguel

Church of St. Nicholas was the religious centre of the medieval borough of the same name and performed an important military and defensive function for the people of the borough.

 

Iglesia de San Nicolás (St. Nicholas Church) Pamplona.

Iglesia de San Nicolás (St. Nicholas Church) Pamplona.

The 12th century church/fortress dates from the transition period between Romanesque and Gothic.

The entrance and the nave of St. Nicholas Church.

The entrance and the nave of St. Nicholas Church. There is the baroque organ in the rearward of the nave.

The church houses a huge baroque organ dating from 1769 which is the finest in the city. In its interior, the vault and apse are Gothic, while the rest of the church is Cistercian in style.

Main alter and its Holy Cross of St. Nicholas Church, Pamplona.

Main alter and its Holy Cross of St. Nicholas Church, Pamplona.

The church is encircled by porticos built in 1888, and It was restored in 1924.

Platz (Square) of the Iglesia San Nikolas

Platz (Square) of the Iglesia San Nikolas

I went to Plaza del Castllo (Square Castllo) through the Paseo Sarasate from Square of the Iglesia San Nikolas.

Paseo Sarasate (Pedestrian precinct of Sarasate)

Paseo Sarasate (Pedestrian precinct of Sarasate)

On the way to the Castllo Square, found the birthplace of Paseo Sarasate on the Sarasate Street.

Restaurante Sarasate Vegetariano

Restaurante Sarasate Vegetariano

It’s now the vegetarian restaurant “Restaurante Sarasate.”

Monument to the Privileges, Palace of the Provincial Council and Bank of Spain, located at the east end of Paseo de Sarasate.

Monument to the Privileges, Palace of the Provincial Council and Bank of Spain, located at the east end of Paseo de Sarasate.

Arrived at Plaza del Castillo (Castle Square) from Paseo Sarasate soon. The Castle Square is in the center of Pamplona.

Plaza del Castillo (Castle Square)

Plaza del Castillo (Castle Square)

So tired, I took some coffee break at the Café Iruña that is one of the most famous and popular cafes in Pamplona.

The entrance Café Iruña.

The entrance Café Iruña.

Café Iruña is very famous for Ernest Hemingway was drunken every night. I have also drank every night, but do not become famous.

After sipping some coffee at the Café Iruña, I went back to the bullring.

The street to the bullring from Plaza del Castillo and Ernest Hemingway and I.

The street to the bullring from Plaza del Castillo and Ernest Hemingway and I.

The statue of Ernest Hemingway is in front of the Bullring, he really loved bullfighting.

I took some photos there and said “goodbye, Ernest,” then left for the next destination.

 

 

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