Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut and Valley of the Queens, Thebes

Queen Hatshepsut (1508–1458 BC) was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Ancient Egypt. She is also known as “the first great woman in history of whom we are informed.”

Statue of Gueen Hatshepsut  Hatshepsut Statuette

She is said that when she was young, she picked up a baby at the river bank of Nile and brought the baby up. The baby was named Moses, with the Exodus of Old Testament.

I believe that she was wise, gentle and a great beauty. She is a perfect woman, however, I advise you that you should not watch her mummy.

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, (“Holy of Holies”), is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el Bahari on the west bank of the Nile.

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

The mortuary temple is dedicated to the sun god Amon-Ra and is located next to the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II, which served both as an inspiration, and later, a quarry.

Wall painting, the Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

Wall painting, the Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

It is considered one of the “incomparable monuments of ancient Egypt.”

The statues of the Hatshepsut's mortuary temple front.

The statues of the Hatshepsut’s mortuary temple front.

The temple was the site of the massacre of 62 people, mostly tourists, by Islamist extremists that took place on 17 November 1997.

The Valley of the Queens 

The Valley of Queens

The Valley of Queens

The information about the Valley of Queen

The information about the Valley of Queen

The Valley of Queens is a place where wives of Pharaohs were buried in ancient times. It was known as Ta-Set-Neferu, meaning –”the place of the Children of the Pharaoh”, because along with the Queens of the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties (1550–1070 BC) many princes and princesses were also buried with various members of the nobility.

The information of Valley of Queens

The information of Valley of Queens

The tombs of these individuals were maintained by mortuary priests who performed daily rituals and provided offerings and prayers for the deceased nobility.

Tomb of Nefertari

Portrait, Nefertari of the Beauty

Portrait, Nefertari of the Beauty

Construction of tne Tomb, Nefertari

Construction of tne Tomb, Nefertari

The entrance of Nefertari’s Tomb

The entrance of Nefertari’s Tomb

Ramses II had a tomb for Nefertari hewn out in the Valley of the Queens called by the ancients “The Place of Beauty”, this tomb is the most beautiful in the Valley of the Queens, and is on the whole worthy of her position in history.

Tomb Signboard of Nefertari

Tomb Signboard of Nefertari

The decorative motifs on walls and ceilings are mythological and are concerned with life in the netherworld, meetings with gods, deities, genii and monsters, and the entry into the realm of eternity.

Wall painting of the tomb

Wall painting of the tomb

In these scenes our queen is represented always wearing long, transparent white garments, with two long feathers over the vulture-like headdress of gold.

Wall painting of the tomb

Wall painting of the tomb

She wears rich jewels, in addition to bracelets and a wide golden collar.

Grace and regal Nefertari

Grace and regal Nefertari

Tomb of Amunherkhepeshef 

Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

Amun-her-khepeshef was the crown prince of Egypt for the first 25 years of Ramesses II’s reign but eventually predeceased his father in Year 25 of his father’s reign.

Portrait of Amun-her-khepeshef, Wall painting of the tomb

Portrait of Amun-her-khepeshef, Wall painting of the tomb

Wall painting of the Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

Wall painting of the Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

Relief of the Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

Relief of the Tomb of Amun-her-khepeshef

This necropolis is said to hold more than seventy tombs, many of which are stylish and lavishly decorated. An example of this is the resting place carved out of the rock for Queen Nefertari. The polychrome reliefs in her tomb are still intact.

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