Valley of the Kings, Ancient city Thebes

The Colossi of Memnon are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3400 years (since 1350 BC) they have stood in the Theban necropolis.

The Colossi of Memnon

The Colossi of Memnon

Excavation is still carried out in the neighbor of The Colossi of Memnon.

An archaeological dig

An archaeological dig

Tombs of the Nobles (Valley of the Kings)

Valley of the Kings

Valley of the Kings

Located in the Theban Necropolis, the Tombs of the Nobles are the burial places of some of the powerful courtiers and persons of the ancient city.

The Tomb of the Noble

The Tomb of Theban governor Ramose

File:Maler der Grabkammer des Ramose 002.jpg

The funeral procession of Ramose, Wall painting

Photography is prohibited inside of the tomb, but a person in charge strongly suggested to take some photographs. He wants a tip. You can take some photographs anywhere if you pay some tip in Egypt. (I get this wall painting from the net.)

Valley of the Kings

The entrance of Valley of the Kings

The entrance of Valley of the Kings

The Valley of  Kings

The Valley of Kings

The tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings became famous for the wealth of treasure it contained.

The tomb of Tutankhamun. This is from the net.

The tomb of Tutankhamun. This is from the net.

The tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter, underneath the remains of workmen’s huts built during the Ramesside Period; this explains why it was spared from the worst of the tomb depredations of that time.

Burial chamber of Tutankhamun

Burial chamber of Tutankhamun

Burial chamber of Tutankhamun

Burial chamber of Tutankhamun

The Burial chamber of Tutankhamunwall decorations are modest in comparison to other royal tombs in the Valley.

The Tomb of Ramesses IV is rather different than most other royal tombs built here.

Entrance of the Tomb of Ramesses IV

Entrance of the Tomb of Ramesses IV

Ramesses III, had been assassinated, and when his son, Ramesses IV took the thrown, he did so in a period of economic decline in Egypt.

The hallway toward the burial chamber.

The hallway toward the burial chamber.

Though large, his tomb is highly simplistic, and unique in many ways.

The burial chamber

The burial chamber

The tomb was known early on, and was in fact used as a sort of hotel by early explorers.

Wall paintings in the tomb of the Ramesses Ⅳ

Wall paintings in the tomb of the Ramesses Ⅳ

It was also an important Coptic Christian dwelling, and was also frequently visited in antiquity.

The relief in the tomb of the Ramses Ⅳ.

The relief in the tomb of the Ramses Ⅳ.

There was considerable Coptic and Greek graffiti on the tomb walls.

The Tomb of Ramesses VII ; Ramesses VII was the sixth pharaoh of the 20th dynasty of Ancient Egypt. He reigned from about 1136 to 1129 BC and was the son of Ramesses VI.

ラムセス7世の墓

Entrance of the Tomb of Ramesses VII

ラムセス7世.-2jpg

Corridor toward the burial chamber

Like some of the other Ramesses’ tombs,  the Tomb of Ramesses VII has been open since antiquity, at least since Greek and Roman times.ram7-1 ram7-2    (The upper photographs are the wall paintings and sarcophagus in the burial chamber.)This tomb was mentioned in more recent times by some Egyptologists and other travelers19th century.

The tomb may have seen some clearing activity by the Egyptian Antiquities department after 1952.

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